updated 12/25/09 MAKE SURE TO REFERESH THE SCREEN FOR LATEST VERSION

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billboard

Three experiments in 3-D interactive visual-verbal rhetoric.

I. Writing inside a Virtual World

III. 3-D Interactive Avatars Writing:

Flow, Coherence, Sympathetic Imagination, The Cognitive Immersion of Literature, Telepresence, Copresence, Resurrection of the Dead

      • [a] 3-D avatar chat fully engaged students in the “flow” and made it easier for some to write coherent essays.
      • [b] Choosing an avatar other than their own, such as a role model, and then engaging in various group chats, also helped students exercise their sympathetic imagination, their ability to see others from the inside.
      • [c] The cognitive immersion of group avatar chat can be compared with reading literature. By offering the interactivity they expect, the online generation was able to experience the internal life of other human beings somewhat like that of reading a novel.
      • [d] This assignment makes it easier to study positive effects specific to virtual worlds, such as telepresence and copresence, the unique feeling of social presence caused by immersion in a virtual environment. (For example, one student was so moved by the way this assignment seemed to bridge the gap between the living and the dead that she kept revisiting her avatar even though she hated computers.)

SELECTED IMAGES and MOVIES


3-D AVATAR CHAT

The students redesigned their personal avatars in Second Life to look like their role models.The range of avatars, seen below, was a testament to the diversity goals of the university and connected the concept of the sympathetic imagination to the goal of multicultural understanding.

x

They were then assigned four different locations on our island to discuss the relationship between leadership and three other topics: compassion, diversity, and history.

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avatar interaction at the “office”

x x

two of the other locations: the campfire and the rug


Brief Movies:

Graduate Assistant Inspects the Chairs of Space 6

Avatars Discussing in A Deck by the Sea

Avatars Discussing in a Living Room by the Sea

Avatars Discussing on a Zebra Rug by the Sea

Avatars Discussing on Modern Furniture by the Wall


 

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Four of the Spaces

 

ile written by Adobe Photoshop® 4.0instructor, hovering in the air, observing two discussions

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instructor observing the discussion on the deck

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instructor observing the discussion in the modernist living room

 

 

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instructor observing the discussion on the rug

 

 

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instructor, hovering in the air, observing the discussion in the living room

 

 

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instructor flying over the wall to return to "The Tower"


“Architextural” Writing


 

3-D INTERACTIVE ROAD MAPS

One student made a series of boardwalks in SL from one "webloader picture" to the next, at one point over the creek. In this hybrid genre, one’s avatar had to virtually walk through his life

BradroadmapinSL
Another student, Mauro Caffarelli, added a third dimension to his hybrid “writing” genre when he used an SL note-writing script to embed texts about his life in four 3-D objects.RdMpReligionRdMpBlackB3
RdMpRowing3RdMpGuitar3
Both students incorporated the interactive motions of a “reader” who had to learn to walk or fly along the creek (or walk in/under its water) to find the objects, as well as “select” them to read the text. By forcing the reader to “walk the talk” to briefly experience someone else’s life, Mauro, like Brad, helped us cross the divide between self and other. They helped us move toward another pedagogical goal of my courses: stretching the sympathetic imagination, “the ability of a person to penetrate the barrier which space puts between him and his object, and, by actually entering into the object, so to speak, to secure a momentary but complete identification with it” (Bate 1945).

ARCHITEXTURAL WRITING

Students were to construct in SL models of the kinds of buildings they wanted to see on campus and they were to embed in these buildings words to persuade others to adopt these buildings as models for their own competing campus architecture master plans.At firstconstructing true 3-D buildings that one could walk into and “inhabit” in SL seemed impossible. However, one student stayed up all night and was able to construct such a building:
Liz3                                   image023-3
The other students gained confidence and went on to produce some extraordinary buildings of their own:

Law2

image034-1image028-2image043-1image044image019image004-2image010image027-3image045-3image023-3image026image043-2-3image004-3image030image016



DETAILS


 

Using Second Life

to increase motivation for writing


WATCH THE BRIEF DVD OVERVIEW

basic question:

DOES IT WORK?

A CASE STUDY:

one Fall 07 Freshman Seminar paper


Did this Freshman Seminar student like computers? No! She is the third student, the one jumping on the box to express her frustrations with computers


She and her colleagues became more comfortable with computers and Second Life. Eventually, they were able to make avatars of their role models and participated in a very unusual class discussion


The instructor flying above the discussion sites waiting for the students
The author of the essay comes to class and checks out the activity of the other students who have already plunged into cyberspace
She sees that they are already in their groups!

She starts up Second Life

The instructor flys up from the discussion area to see if she has landed by the tower yet

The class becomes focused on Second Life, with two DIIA employees, Michael Mayrath and Mario Guerra, waiting to help anyone who needs it


The primary sound in this class, as in the 603 class, is keyboarding

Her grandmother arrives!


Her grandmother joins her first discussion group as the instructor observes


Her grandmother in her second group while the instructor flys up from the second group 4


Her grandmother in her second group with the instructor obvserving



Documentation


E603A FALL 06 AND E603B SPRING 07 (PLAN 2)

E603A  WEB SITE   E603B SCHEDULE

Fall 06-Spring 07 evaluation by instructor

An example of D.I.I.A. evaluation questions

D.I.I.A. Final Report 06-07


E603A AND FS301 FALL 07

07 E603A SCHEDULE  (PLAN 2)

FS 301 WEB SITE  (PLAN 1)

DIIA pre SL survey: FS 301

DIIA pre SL survey: 603A

DIIA pre SL survey:   COMBINED


MORE IMAGES

FS 301: initial frustration

FS 301 avatars

FS301 using SL in class


DIIA post SL survey :   COMBINED

DIIA FOCUS GROUP questions


D.I.I.A. Second Life site

Professor   JEROME  BUMP   mail:bump@mail.utexas.edu

Jerome Bump, Professor of English, University of Texas at Austin. First director of the Computer Writing and Research Lab (1985-1989). Author of C.A.I. in Writing at the University: Some Recommendations," Computers and Education 11.2 (1987), 121-133; "Radical Changes in Class Discussion Using Networked Computers," Computers and the Humanities 24 (1990):49-65; "Teaching English in Second Life," Currents (2007); "Left vs. Right Side of the Brain: Hypermedia and the new Puritanism" Currents (1997); “Collaborative Learning in the Postmodern Classroom” in Situating College English: Lessons from an American University (1996); papers on computers and English at the Universities of Paris, Pittsburgh, Indiana, and NCTE, CCCC, CCTE, and the Fifth and Sixth Computers and Writing Conferences, the IBM AEP conference; and recipient of grants for writing in virtual worlds, computerized invention heuristics, and multimedia autobiographies.

Office: Parlin 132


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